Crossing the Digital Divide: Race, Writing, and Technology by Barbara Jean Monroe

By Barbara Jean Monroe

As negative, nonwhite groups on ''the different side'' of the electronic divide turn into immersed in digital media, how do we evaluation their stories to rework the instructing of writing and literature and enhance pupil studying? this significant publication deals a balanced view of tutorial know-how and demanding multiculturalism, with useful insights to aid English educators in any respect degrees operating in every kind of colleges.

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Extra info for Crossing the Digital Divide: Race, Writing, and Technology in the Classroom (Language and Literacy Series)

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To be sure, making these connections is no easy task, given both the disconnect between educational institutions and also the very real consequences of the lack of access of all sorts—to the Internet, to human resources, to time, to money, to power. When all these conditions do conspire to make interconnectivity possible, the insights gained need to be shared with the profession and with the public. The chapters that follow aim to do just that. They offer qualitative case studies of four high-poverty schools as they enter the Information Age and interact with outsiders, variously defined.

The couple in graduate school spent about 20 percent of their annual income on computers one semester; while the other couple, who worked in a factory, spent about 20 percent of their income on jet skis. Neither could understand the other’s priorities. The factoryworking couple obviously did not see the value of computers, either for leisure or for work, because computing had absolutely nothing to do with the way they made their living. Nor were computers worth their entertainment value, at least not compared to water sports for the family.

The chapters that follow aim to do just that. They offer qualitative case studies of four high-poverty schools as they enter the Information Age and interact with outsiders, variously defined. These case studies feature a tiny portion of a mountain of student writing that I have amassed from institutional crossings of the digital divide for several years. The student writing in many ways speaks for itself, but it also raises the hard question that dogs us as English educators: Given the systemic conditions that support a racist world, how then do we actually teach writing and literature?

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